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The Honor of Being Number One!

 

First in the country! An honor for any accomplishment but many Erie Pa. residents are thinking twice about as we are in a neck-to-neck tie with Syracuse, N.Y. for the most snow in the country. It has been a long season of harsh temperatures and endless snow flurries. For snow lovers, it is quite the honor to be number one!

Blog MapErie, the summer residence of the late John Kanzius and home to the Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation, also shares the top spot with Sanibel, Fla. (John’s winter community) for the place where “a better way” to treat cancer began. An honor gladly shared as these two communities served as a catalyst for the world to see, and emulate. Through believing, spreading the wave and generous philanthropy, the progression of research using a novel radiowave generating machine with targeted cancer-killing agents, has given these communities much to be proud of.

What other cities can claim “the birthplace of the treatment that changed the cancer world?”  Today I want to address what that change is and what is next in the process. John Kanzius, was a broadcast engineer with an incredible understanding of radio frequencies. That journey began early in his career when a coworker warned him of the results if his car keys were in his pocket while climbing a radio tower. “As you climb the tower, the radiowaves get more intense and it will heat the metal of your keys so much, it may burn your leg!” Seems that John was also very smart! He would routinely place his keys in his locker and go out into the field.

Years later, his remarkable memory may just be what will change the cancer world! While going through his own personal battle with cancer, seeing small children gruesomely treated as he was, he’d lay in bed at night thinking to himself, there has to be “a better way” to treat this disease. And that’s when his “ah ha moment” occurred. His surviving spouse, Marianne, recalls how she would find John in their kitchen, cutting up her pie pans and tinkering with his Hamm radios. His response, “I’m going to cure cancer!” 

John Kanzius3 He built a very crude radiowave generator/receptor by attaching a pie pan to each radio – creating a frequency field in between.  Next he took a hot dog – yes perhaps even one of the infamous Smith Hot Dog made in Erie – and dangled on a string between the two concoctions. He turned them on and nothing happened. But, when he placed a copper probe into the tip of the hot dog, the meat started to cook…but only where the metal was. The remaining part remained cold and hence the birth of the Kanzius Noninvasive Radiowave Cancer Treatment theory: direct small metallic pieces of metal (nanoparticles) to only the cancer cells and pass a controlled radiowave (13.56 MHz) over the tumor. The result, killing cancer cells without side effects!

While naysayers have scorned those that believe, research has proved them wrong! Numerous published manuscripts in both medical and scientific journals validate John’s theory. Such a strong confirmation that the researchers will be submitting their application to the FDA very soon. FDA consultants are currently working with our research team at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, preparing the necessary case to present with their application. You only get one shot at this, and it must be right.

FDAWe are nearing the day where the clock is turned on and it will no longer be a matter of more research or more money. Once the application is filed, the FDA “must” schedule and conduct an in-person interview within 90 days. Following that investigative meeting, the FDA will have 75 days to determine if and when human trials can begin.

It’s almost surreal. FDA approval? Human Trials? We have worked so hard and waited so long. And all the while, countless family and friends have lost their fight. We continue to honor every cancer patient and survivor with the commitment to see this through to the end. The day we cross the finish line, countless people from around the world will join Sanibel and Erie because of their role in this miraculous wave movement. That day, they too can claim the honor of being number one!

 

MARK A. NEIDIG SR. is executive director of the Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation (MNeidig@Kanzius.org). 

This blog space has been created to invite and encourage discussion regarding the mission of the Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation and the research of the Kanzius Noninvasive Radiowave Cancer Treatment. Comments that do not stay in line with the message, such as posts attempting to use this forum for promotion or advertising space, gain publicity or that publicly shame an individual or entity, will be deleted.  

News of Rising Cancer Cases Demands Aggressive Action

 

I am many things in this life, but I have never claimed to be a writer. Sure, I took college classes to learn to communicate effectively, but how do you adequately prepare to share the heart-wrenching stories of cancer patients and their families? Putting into words the emotions surrounding the words “you have cancer” is by far the most challenging task I’m faced with. It is a message that people dissuade because it is news that no one wants to hear.

Yet, it’s a diagnosis that nearly 4,600 people receive daily in the United States alone (according to a 2013 report by the SEER Program of the National Cancer Institute). In the past 24 hours, four of my friends communicated with me that either a family member or loved one had just been diagnosed— two with just months to live. It’s also the unfortunate news that a prominent journalist, Tom Brokaw, heard last month when he was diagnosed with the disease. As someone who has shared far too many of these cancer announcements, I re-examined the statistics on just how many people are diagnosed each year.

WHO graphAccording to the WHO, annual cancer
rates are estimated to increase
from 14 million cases in 2012 to
22 million cases in 2032
The World Health Organization (WHO) recently released their first cancer report of 2014 and the startling results reinvigorated followers of the Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation and heightened the urgency of our mission to prove “a better way” to treat the disease is possible. In 2012, cancer was the leading cause of death and accounted for 8.2 million deaths worldwide. However, it was the report’s cancer projections that were even more alarming. Annual cancer rates are estimated to increase from 14 million cases in 2012 to 22 million cases annually within the next two decades. That’s 57% more cancer patients each year that will be fighting for their lives. That is a message that I, in no possible way, can diminish when writing.

While many cancer patients have a high chance of survival when the disease is detected early and treated immediately, it is the method of treatment that is the real issue. Relying solely on aggressive chemotherapy and radiation treatments may work in certain instances; however, even when those instances result in cancer remission and survival, the quality of life for those patients is often laden with terrible, lingering side effects. By raising awareness and advocating for FDA approval, the Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation will prove a better, more humane treatment method is possible for far more than 22 million people in the long run. Looking towards the future state of the expanding cancer population provides the Kanzius Foundation and our team of researchers with immense motivation; however, relentlessly working to find “a better way” for the existing patients is just as pressing of a mission.

tom brokaw Tom Brokaw
Photo by John Lamparski
© WireImage.com
Breaking news shook the nation’s cancer community when NBC Correspondent, Tom Brokaw, revealed that he was diagnosed with multiple myeloma, a cancer that affects blood cells in the bone marrow. The veteran journalist, who has worked at NBC Newssince 1966, is remaining optimistic in the midst of his health crisis. Brokaw, who has refused to let his diagnosis affect his day-to-day life, has led an inspiring fight so far. He continues to work on a JFK documentary and recently contributed to the sports coverage for the Sochi Winter Olympics. However, many cancer patients aren’t as fortunate when it comes to their ability to stay active. Chemotherapy and other traditional treatment methods leave much of the cancer population chronically weak and exhausted, leaving very little possibility for a fulfilled, unaffected life.

Despite the side-effects of currently used methods, there is a silver lining for the nation’s cancer community and it lies within the FDA. Patients, such as Brokaw, who have been diagnosed with multiple myeloma,  have had their expected lifespan doubled from what it was 16 years ago. In the past decade, those suffering from myeloma have seen the FDA approve six new treatments for their specific type of cancer, an incredible pace of innovation in oncology. This fast-paced advancement and increase in FDA approval has not only been the cause behind the increase in patient life expectancy, but has also painted a favorable picture for Kanzius’ own timeline of getting our treatment approved by the FDA and commencing human trials.

mark and nicole Nicole and Me
Unfortunately, the process of introducing new and improved drugs and treatments does not work fast enough for most. Today, I am returning from the funeral of a fourteen year old girl who battled cancer for the past seven years. I met this precious teen, Nicole, several years ago in her hospital room. Her smile and positive spirit served as a reminder to me of what our organization strives for. And just as John Kanzius was prompted to devise a side-effect free cancer treatment after seeing children undergo harsh treatments; I, too, am compelled to work endlessly toward John’s dream and will never stop believing that his theory is possible.

The number of new cancer cases continues to rise and the list of loved ones who succumb to the disease continues to grow. With that in mind, we must approach every day with aggression and work towards advancing our research with the unyielding determination that a side-effect free cancer treatment will be possible for the millions of people that we have never met and very possibly have not even been diagnosed yet.

Mark Neidig, Executive Director of Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation
MARK A. NEIDIG SR. is executive director of the Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation (MNeidig@Kanzius.org). 

 

This blog space has been created to invite and encourage discussion regarding the mission of the Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation and the research of the Kanzius Noninvasive Radiowave Cancer Treatment. Comments that do not stay in line with the message, such as posts attempting to use this forum for promotion or advertising space, gain publicity or that publicly shame an individual or entity, will be deleted.  

Love Grows for “A Better Way” to Treat Cancer

 

john Kanzius4Love is in the air.  It has to be— it’s nearing February 14th! However, for Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation, this time of year brings up another kind of love: love lost. It was around this time five years ago, just four days after Valentine’s Day, that John Kanzius lost his battle to cancer. Erie, Pennsylvania and Sanibel, Florida, along with the nation’s cancer community, lost a hero. But as time has gone on, the love for John and his dream of “a better way” to treat cancer has grown.

Every single day, I talk to patients and their loved ones about the hope that the Kanzius Noninvasive Radiowave Cancer Treatment brings. For these people, and the countless followers who have financially supported the work of the Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation through the years, their love for John Kanzius and his determination to find a noninvasive, side-effect free treatment continues to grow each day.

describe the imageTheir love grows as a result of the stellar and encouraging research outcomes that have been published by our team. It is not a laboratory or an institution that does the research, but rather the passionate people who fell in love with John’s dream. I'm talking leaders— experts in the field of cancer research who do not accept the current state of cancer treatment and feel there is “a better way.” These individuals know no boundaries. It is this determination that sets Team Kanzius apart. It will be this determination that gets us to human trials.

Doctors such as Steven Curley, Evan Glazer, Stuart Corr, David Geller, Mustafa Raoof, Hong Koo Kim, Warna Kaluarachchi, Dustin Kruse and Katherine Ferrara have been catalysts in the tedious and grueling trek to validate the Kanzius Noninvasive Radiowave Cancer Treatment – a treatment with minimal or no side effects. It’s not easy to ask researchers to put their careers and reputations on the line to prove a theory contrary to traditionally accepted cancer treatments. Many world renowned cancer centers won’t take the chance on treatments like ours, but the researchers working on the Kanzius project have embraced John’s dream. They believe in “a better way.” They are Team Kanzius. No single doctor is indispensable and collectively, they understand that whatever the future holds, the research must move forward with the same aggression and fervency.

baylorI have heard some alarming responses to the recent announcement that Dr. Curley accepted a new leadership position at the Baylor College of Medicine—a move that will transport the Kanzius Laboratory and his key investigative team of fifteen with him. This decision transpired over a six month period and involved both careful consideration and counsel from the Kanzius Foundation. The lab’s physical location should have no bearing upon your support or advocacy for the research. The original lab space at MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDA) was provided by The University of Texas, for a fee and paid for by you, our donors as well as every other expense, from labor and benefits to supplies and equipment. Every piece of equipment granted to Dr. Curley at MDA moved with our team to Baylor. This crucial equipment is now fully operational in a state-of-the-art space nearly twice the size of Kanzius’ previous lab.

Last October, Dr. Curley shared in the fall issue of “the wave” Newsletter and exclusively with Lilly Broadcasting's reporter Lisa Adams, that negotiations had been finalized for a new company to assume ownership of the intellectual properties (IP's) of the Kanzius treatment and the Radio-frequency (RF) device from the for-profit company, ThermMed, LLC. John had set up ThermMed to develop prototype RF devices and, ultimately, take the treatment concept to market. After passing, his surviving spouse, Marianne, became the managing partner of ThermMed.

Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation, on the other hand, is a 501c3 tax-exempt organization approved by the IRS to create national and global awareness of the Kanzius treatment and to raise funds to help accelerate the speed at which research progresses through human trials. Since the commencement of the Kanzius Foundation, we have funded only research using the RF device and maintained and consistently communicated a very distinct separation from ThermMed. Seeing cancer patients benefit from John’s idea and potentially saving lives was the end goal for both organizations; yet, we had very different missions. We had an amicable relationship, but remained autonomous throughout every decision we made. 

AkesoGenX HoustonOn January 3rd, the Kanzius Foundation was notified by telephone that the sale was complete. The new owner, AkesoGenX, is a Denver/Houston-based corporation. We encourage you to read the mission statement of AkesoGenX. In spirit, it is the same as ThermMed’s: to take the Kanzius technology to market – to save lives! The number one priority for AkesoGenX is to present the outcomes of the Kanzius research to the FDA this year— a day which we’ve all long-awaited with great anticipation. Every donor and cancer patient is eager to hear the results of that meeting.

Now, more than ever, Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation needs to keep the research moving forward and your continued support can make that happen. 

John would have loved to see this day. “A better way,” as he dreamed of, is very near.

 

MARK A. NEIDIG SR. is executive director of the Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation (MNeidig@Kanzius.org).

 

This blog space has been created to invite and encourage discussion regarding the mission of the Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation and the research of the Kanzius Noninvasive Radiowave Cancer Treatment. Comments that do not stay in line with the message, such as posts attempting to use this forum for promotion or advertising space, gain publicity or that publicly shame an individual or entity, will be deleted.  

Pay it Forward for Cancer Research

 

As I watched a two-hour television special about the highlights of 2013, I was reminded of just how remarkable the year was – full of milestones, tragedies and celebrations.  And, I’m sure each of us have those special memories that surface to the top. Even the simple, yet so impactful, “pay it forward” initiative is right near the top for me. I can still remember how I felt when I pulled up to pay for my coffee at the Starbucks drive-thru window and was told “there is no charge sir, the car before you paid!” WOW!  Me? Mine?! That person didn’t even know me?

Without question, 2013 was a year of milestones, tragedies and celebrations for the Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation as well. It’s important to reflect back on the past year as we embark upon the bright possibilities of 2014.

We hit the ground running with the national release of our first PSA entitled “A Better Way” that featured six individuals who have, in some way, been affected by cancer. Filmed at the faces2012 national conference, Erie-based R. Frank Photography generously donated their time to record and edit the production. “A Better Way” aired in mid-January on DishTV and sparked more interest than ever in our mission for a side-effect free cancer treatment.

On February 15th, the scientific journal Biomaterials published a manuscript compiled by our lead investigator, Dr. Steven Curley and his research team summarizing numerous studies that show that the Kanzius radio frequency (RF) field can be used to release drugs from carbon nanoparticles; a very important proof of principle. These studies proved that the act of releasing non-toxic peptides (proteins) to increase the heat sensitivity of cancer cells may be possible.

Along this road of promising scientific progress, we never lose sight of what is truly important and what the foundation’s ultimate goal is. “Our number one priority is to get this promising technology in front of the FDA, and we are committed to moving forward and overcoming any barriers and obstacles that might come into the path of our success,” said Dr. Curley in his spring research update, “FDA the #1 priority.”

describe the imageThe Kanzius Foundation announced on May 10th the commencement of the “Million Dollar Challenge;” a fundraising effort celebrating an anonymous $1 million donation contingent upon our raising an additional $250,000 from current and $250,000 from new donors. You accepted this challenge and, in ten short weeks, helped us raise over $1.5 million for our research and propelling us even closer to reaching the dream of John Kanzius: “a better way” to treat cancer.

After months of calibration and intricate preparation, tests using the GenV Kanzius Device (a human-sized machine) began with a controlled group of large, non-human laboratory subjects. The preliminary outcomes demonstrated that the RF treatment administered to the lab subjects through our GenV Device was not only effective in killing 100% of the liver cancer cells, but was also side-effect free with no toxic or damaging results seen in the neighboring tissues.

dr curley 2Dr. Steven Curley
Lead Kanzius Researcher

While on a visit to our Houston labs in October, Dr. Curley, revealed that as a result of the successful large animal studies, the Kanzius Noninvasive Radiowave Cancer Treatment was nearing human trials. He announced that ThermMed LLC, started by the late John Kanzius had completed negotiations with a new group to transfer the ownership of the intellectual properties (patents). “The new company will help support the research, but they are also very goal directed at getting in front of the FDA,” Curley shared. The Kanzius research team is preparing to approach the FDA in early 2014 and the treatment could advance to human trials as early as 2015.

As our research team makes the necessary preparations, the promising research advancements of 2013 make us hopeful that this meeting with the FDA will pave the way for human trials with immediacy and urgency. We know so many are depending on this.

So, we welcome you 2014 with great anticipation! And I pray that my forecast is correct – that your commitment to “a better way” will be rewarded – that we can advance to the FDA and beyond.  Because, each time you donate to Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation, it is really not for you.  It is your way to “pay it forward” for that unknown person who is in desperate need for the promising outcomes of OUR cancer research.  And for that, I say thank you from each of them!

Come explore the Kanzius Timeline to see how much has been accomplished as we near FDA approval and human trials!

 

MARK A. NEIDIG SR. is executive director of the Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation (MNeidig@Kanzius.org). 

 

This blog space has been created to invite and encourage discussion regarding the mission of the Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation and the research of the Kanzius Noninvasive Radiowave Cancer Treatment. Comments that do not stay in line with the message, such as posts attempting to use this forum for promotion or advertising space, gain publicity or that publicly shame an individual or entity, will be deleted.  

Celebrating the Gift of Life After a Cancer Diagnosis

 


dreamstimefree 56772 freeWith the holiday season fast approaching, we are constantly bombarded from every direction by retailers and I must confess even non-profit organizations, with that “perfect gift” idea for your loved one.  Gifts come in many different forms.  For some it may be the latest iPad Mini with Retina Display or a Furby Boom figure; yet for others, it could be something as simple as getting to spend time with the ones you love.  My dad just turned 80 years old and a group of family and friends gathered to celebrate his life.  Literally!  You see, earlier in the year, dad was diagnosed with stage IV melanoma.  As is the case with every cancer diagnosis, our family experienced some very frightening and uncertain days.  Yet, as dad stood in front of this party crowd, he shared with us the greatest gift he had received this year.  Life! 

This notion also struck me a couple of weeks ago while I was watching “Good Morning America” (GMA) and Amy Robach announced that she had breast cancer. That scene will forever be ingrained in my memory because it resonated so closely with the mission of the Kanzius Foundation. At 40 years old, she had never gotten a mammogram before and was not the least bit inclined to get one—after all, cancer did not run in her family. However, on October 1st, GMA producers and even her colleague and two-time cancer survivor Robin Roberts, convinced Robach to get the test done on-air as part of their launch of Breast Cancer Awareness Month claiming that “even if only one life was saved” from Robach doing the test, “it would be worth it.” This statement could not have been farther from the truth. The mammogram showed she had cancer.

amy robach robin roberts breast cancer Robin Roberts and Amy Robach

While I know it seems strange to associate a breast cancer diagnosis with a gift, in this circumstance, Robach’s early detection was truly a blessing and might just have “saved a life” – hers! In the near future, I pray that the Kanzius Noninvasive Radiowave Cancer Treatment will one be a gift to those in the cancer community – a gift of relief to those who don’t wish to go through the painful side effects of traditional chemotherapy or radiation treatments or the scars of invasive surgeries. I pray it will be the gift of life.

Although Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation focuses on finding “a better way” to treat cancer and encouraging patients who have already been diagnosed, we must not forget those who have yet to discover their disease as well as those who have battled cancer and survived. We must wholeheartedly support, encourage and fight for those who have been affected by cancer. Finding “a better way” is a huge step in the right direction; however, early detection is an equally great step.

When Robach announced her cancer diagnosis, one quote in particular stuck out to me: “I know that I have a fight ahead of me, but I also know that I have a lot worth fighting for.” With that succinct phrase, she not only encompassed what it means to be a part of the cancer community, but also what it means to be a part of our family at the Kanzius Foundation. We know that we have a fight ahead of us to get to human trials and receive FDA approval, but we also know that once we do, our fight will have been well worth it. When the Kanzius Noninvasive Radiowave Cancer Treatment saves that first life, all of our efforts will have been validated. They will have resulted in a gift - the gift of life.

MARK A. NEIDIG SR. is executive director of the Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation (MNeidig@Kanzius.org). 

 

This blog space has been created to invite and encourage discussion regarding the mission of the Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation and the research of the Kanzius Noninvasive Radiowave Cancer Treatment. Comments that do not stay in line with the message, such as posts attempting to use this forum for promotion or advertising space, gain publicity or that publicly shame an individual or entity, will be deleted.  

The FDA is Our Ally in Advancing Kanzius Cancer Research

 

News recently broke of our plan to approach the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in early 2014 and begin human trials in early 2015. This is an exciting and incredibly promising development for our research and, even more so, for the cancer community. With each step we take, no matter how small, we inch closer to reaching human trials. The process of finalizing and legitimizing cancer research can be a lengthy one. Conducting laboratory tests, getting positive, reassuring results and drastically advancing our progress in finding “a better way” is simply not enough. The Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation needs FDA approval to make John Kanzius’ dream of finding a side effect free, noninvasive cancer treatment a reality.

describe the image
...we need FDA approval

Although time-consuming, the meticulous process towards FDA approval is necessary and provides us with the next stepping stone to reach human trials. I visited the FDA website (fda.gov) to dig deeper into what role the organization has in the Kanzius research timeline and was pleased to find their emphasis on medical innovation. The “FDA is responsible for protecting the public health by assuring the safety, efficacy and security of humans.” In addition, they are also in charge of “advancing the public health by helping to speed innovations that make medicines more effective, safer, and more affordable and by helping the public get the accurate, science-based information they need to use medicines and foods to maintain and improve their health.”

While I understand people’s frustration with this process, I view the FDA as our near and dear ally— a fellow soldier in the war on cancer and the strongest defender of cancer patients’ rights. There are those that have contrary opinions and believe that the FDA will hinder the advancement of our research. However, rumors and conspiracy theories such as these only muddy our passion, vision and effectiveness in finishing our job and starting to save lives. To date, the FDA has had nothing but words of encouragement and praise for our research and the promise it offers cancer patients. The proof is in the data; the outcomes will determine our destiny.

describe the image
Dr. Steven Curley, Lead Kanzius Researcher

Dr. Steven Curley, lead researcher for the Kanzius Project in Houston, is particularly invested in seeing the Kanzius Noninvasive Radiowave Cancer Treatment gain FDA approval and reach human trials. A long-time friend of the late John Kanzius, Dr. Curley made a promise to John that he would see his treatment through to human trials—a promise that he fully intends to keep.

While Dr. Curley and our research team have conducted tests which have shown that the GenV Kanzius Device and the treatment have not caused any negative or toxic side effects in large, nonhuman laboratory subjects, the FDA will be responsible for ensuring that both the device and the treatment are also harmless and totally safe for humans.

The expeditious and hard work of our donors, volunteers and advocates has not gone unnoticed. Your support and dedication to the Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation has led us to this crucial point. Your actions proclaim its urgency. The results of our research have proven the treatment’s effectiveness and it is now time to expedite the process through the FDA. The Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation’s mission has always been to fund the research of this treatment through to human trials and to bring John Kanzius’ dream to fruition—meeting with the FDA brings us closer to reaching that goal.

Throughout the approval process, we must realize that the Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation and the FDA are on the same page and fighting the same fight: allowing innovation in the field of cancer treatment while ensuring the patients’ rights are preserved and their safety is protected. We, as a cancer community, have done our part. Now comes the difficult task of remaining patient as the FDA does theirs.

MARK A. NEIDIG SR. is executive director of the Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation (MNeidig@Kanzius.org). 

 

This blog space has been created to invite and encourage discussion regarding the mission of the Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation and the research of the Kanzius Noninvasive Radiowave Cancer Treatment. Comments that do not stay in line with the message, such as posts attempting to use this forum for promotion or advertising space, gain publicity or that publicly shame an individual or entity, will be deleted.  

Does Breast Cancer Research Encourage You to Wear Pink?

 

Pink. Have you noticed that color is everywhere? One might even call pink the new orange for fall. I have personally chosen to wear something pink every single day in October to recognize and honor all of the women and men who have been diagnosed during National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. A key element of the brilliant awareness branding is painting our world pink. Why raise all this hype about awareness? One in eight women will develop invasive breast cancer and, this year, over 220,000 women and 2,150 men will be newly diagnosed.

Mark Neidig, Executive Director, wearing pink in honor of breast cancer awareness month
Mark Neidig, Exectutive Director, on day 1 of 31 wearing pink.

However, this statistic has a much greater impact if you put a face to it.  Recently, I was on the west coast and had an enormous decision to make early one morning: stairs or elevator. Yes, we’ve all faced that dilemma at one time. Opting for the elevator, I pushed the button and stood waiting, almost with a sense of guilt for not choosing the fitness route. The elevator door opened and there stood a stunningly beautiful woman. She had a colorful pink turban wrapped around her head. I instantly knew what that meant and in the solitude of that two floor ride, I was compelled to share my empathy with her. “How are you doing?” I asked. She smiled and replied, “Really well today, but I’ve had my share of bad days. Why do you ask?” My response was short but sincere, “I work with a remarkable cancer research project and to be honest, I do what I do because of people like you.” As she walked out of the elevator, she turned to me and said, “Thank you! I’m alive today because someone believed in and donated to cancer research!” I will never forget her parting words or her face. That brief visit was so inspiring.

I often begin a public presentation by asking the audience if they know someone who has or has had cancer. Rarely is there a hand that does not go up, and I’d venture to say the same is true about breast cancer specifically. Celebrities are often exploited in the tabloids when they go public about their diagnosis. Individuals like Olivia Newton-John, Robin Roberts, Angelina Jolie and Elizabeth Edwards strengthen patients with their public fights. And yet, those who are affected by the disease and are closest to us, impact us the most. My mom had a scare when I was a young child, but even more impactful was my sister-in-law, Tina Marie, who lost her battle with cancer thirteen years ago. Every time I see my brother and beautiful niece and nephew I’m reminded of the fight that must not stop until there is ultimate victory.

IMAG0328 1Last week I was in Houston with a television crew interviewing Dr. Steven Curley and several of his key researchers from the Kanzius Research Team at MD Anderson Cancer Center.  We specifically asked about progress on triple-negative breast cancer research – an especially challenging type of breast cancer that is difficult to treat traditionally. Stuart J. Corr, PhD and Postdoctoral Research Associate explained that “triple-negative breast cancer is different from other breast cancers in that it does not have surface receptors, or ‘ears’ and ‘eyes’ for the cell, to intake traditional hormone and drug treatments. This characteristic makes these treatments ineffective.”  However, Corr also pointed out the potential use of noninvasive radiofrequency (RF) cancer therapy.  “Radiowaves, such as those you tune into using the car radio, can penetrate deep into breast tissue without causing adverse side effects. Our recent work has shown that RF energy causes an 'interesting effect' in animal breast cancer tumors – it dilates and opens up the tumor blood networks allowing more chemotherapeutics to get inside. In theory, this effectively means we can decrease chemotherapy dosage, increase the efficacy and reduce the negative side effects of chemotherapy.” Even though Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation is determined to prove “a better way” of treating this terrible disease, with dignity and respect for the patient, is possible. That journey, as I have said so often, is long and tedious. Baby steps may seem fruitless, but often uncover nuggets of extremely beneficial information that are ultimately life changing and lifesaving.

CFKTThis is one of many breakthroughs that will be featured during the Sixth Annual Lilly Broadcasting’s “Community for Kanzius” Telethon on October 14th. In the past five years, more than $750,000 has been raised by the telethons to make our research possible. Your generous support provided funding for this triple negative breast cancer study and continues to provide for a myriad of other ongoing research, including cancer of the pancreas, liver, lung, colon, skin, blood, prostate and children’s bones.gh this research is being conducted on nonhuman subjects, the findings show a possible solution and tremendous promise for patients with triple-negative breast cancer.

Pink may not be your color; however, for the thirty-one days in October, it should be. I encourage you to think pink and stand by a friend or loved one that is depending on breast cancer research to get them through.

Exclusive “behind the scenes” footage and video interviews from the Kanzius Research Labs in Houston will be aired during Lilly Broadcasting’s sixth annual “Community for Kanzius” Telethon on Monday, October 14, 2013 5-8 pm (EST). Viewers are encouraged to make a donation to support of the research through the telethon. Tax-deductible contributions can be made by calling the telethon hotline displayed during the broadcast, mailing your check to 130 West 8th Street, Erie, PA 16501 (put telethon in memo,) calling (814) 480-5776, or by donating online at www.Kanzius.org/telethon.

MARK A. NEIDIG SR. is executive director of the Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation (MNeidig@Kanzius.org). 

 

This blog space has been created to invite and encourage discussion regarding the mission of the Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation and the research of the Kanzius Noninvasive Radiowave Cancer Treatment. Comments that do not stay in line with the message, such as posts attempting to use this forum for promotion or advertising space, gain publicity or that publicly shame an individual or entity, will be deleted.  

I Am Crazy! Are you?

 

 

steve jobs
Steve Jobs

I love a good movie!  Recently, I had the opportunity to see "Jobs," the new release about Apple founder and technology guru, Steve Jobs. As is the case with many Hollywood productions, truth is intertwined with fiction to create a meaningful experience.  However, verbatim quotes from Mr. Jobs are inevitably authentic and often quite profound.  One in particular grabbed my attention and caused me to walk out of the theater speechless: “The ones who are crazy enough to think that they can change the world, are the ones who do."

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John Kanzius

Quotes are often part of an individual’s legacy.  What a person accomplished in their lifetime, complimented by what they said, molds generations to come. It reminds me of another “crazy” quote – one by John Kanzius: “there has to be a better way.” For years, many believed, and unfortunately still do, that there is only one way to treat cancer – a way that involves chemotherapy and harmful side effects. That belief was shattered when John decided to “change the world” of cancer treatment by envisioning the Kanzius Noninvasive Radiowave Cancer Treatment.

wright brothers
The Wright Brothers

Steve Jobs and John Kanzius are not the only “crazy ones” who aimed to change the world. The power of “thinking big” can be seen throughout our civilization’s history. Almost every groundbreaking discovery or event we know of today can be attributed to a couple of crazy individuals who decided to think outside the box.

Before 1903, any sort of air travel was unheard of. The idea of having a human travel through the air in a navigated device was only a reality in science fiction books. However, Wilbur and Orville Wright dreamed big and decided that they wanted to fly. After years of trial and error and endless determination, the Wright brothers turned a crazy idea into reality and took their first flight on December 17, 1903, changing our civilization’s idea of aviation forever.

jfk and webb
John F. Kennedy, James Webb

Before 1969, putting a man on the moon sounded like a crazy idea. While most people met the idea of space travel with total disbelief and laughter, President John F. Kennedy, NASA Administrator James Webb and astronaut Neil Armstrong thought it could be done. These “crazy” individuals dared to challenge common logic and it resulted in the most revolutionary feat in space travel to date. On July 20, 1969, millions of Americans watched the impossible happen as Neil Armstrong took the most remarkable steps in history and planted our nation’s flag on the moon.

Neil Armstrong on The Moon
Neil Armstrong

Ten years ago, people might have called John crazy for believing in the possibility of treating cancer with small pieces of metal and radiowaves; add to that a goal to develop a treatment with NO side effects. Today, thanks to John’s determination and the power of “thinking big”, the Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation has taken massive steps towards making a side effect-free treatment a reality.

I believe John Kanzius was on to something!  And I am just crazy enough to think that “a better way” is possible – a way that will change the how cancer is treated – a way that will change the world.  How about you? Are you crazy enough to join me…because we are going to change the world!

 

This blog space has been created to invite and encourage discussion regarding the mission of the Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation and the research of the Kanzius Noninvasive Radiowave Cancer Treatment. Comments that do not stay in line with the message, such as posts attempting to use this forum for promotion or advertising space, gain publicity or that publicly shame an individual or entity, will be deleted.  

Keeping our Sights on Human Trials

 


dreamstimefree 116593 free climberWhen mountain climbing, the last part of the trek is the hardest. The hiker begins with a good night’s sleep, a hearty meal and a determination to reach the top. However, soon, the hiker grows tired and weary, yet knows he must never give up or lose sight of the peak. Cancer research is very similar – it is a trek to human trials.

The painful side effects of John Kanzius’ treatments caused him many restless nights. However, it was the plaguing sight of young children undergoing the same harsh treatments that he was experiencing that really kept him up at night. These images made Kanzius even more determined to find “a better way” to treat cancer.

After a recent press conference held at the Kanzius Foundation, one reporter remarked, “I had no idea just how far the research has come and how close you are getting!” Prompted by that statement, I want to walk you through our trek and bring you to where we are today – nearing the peak of the mountain and closer than ever to human trials.

It started with John Kanzius’ theory:  If small pieces of metal are directed to cancer cells specifically and passed over with a radiowave at a low, controlled frequency, then the radiowave will heat the metal, destroying only the cancer while leaving surrounding tissue unharmed.

Controlling radiowaves required multiple generations of the Kanzius RF Device. Under the direction of John, our lead investigator, Dr. Steven A. Curley of MD Anderson Cancer Center, worked with an Erie-based family business whose expertise was in manufacturing. Simultaneous monitoring of the device in Erie and in the Houston lab immediately began producing stellar outcomes – the device could heat metal and kill cancer in petri dishes!

Despite tremendous progress, momentum slowed after John’s death. The newly formed Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation committed to fund the necessary research to prove this horrid disease could be treated without harming the patient in the process.

One vital question, unanswered by John, remained: how can the nanoparticles be directed to only the cancer cells? This final piece of the puzzle was solved thanks to you, our donors. Your donations funded the multiple studies that helped differentiate the unique proteins of a cancer cell as opposed to the neighboring healthy ones. Taking this discovery and translating it from the petri dish into animal studies has opened a world of transformational outcomes. Numerous publications have validated our funded studies showing cancer cells being destroyed with controlled radiowaves WITHOUT side effects.

The final and most tedious studies face our researchers now – proving the Kanzius Noninvasive Radiowave Cancer Treatment works in large, laboratory animals. Three newly manufactured, larger radiowave devices (GenV), capable of performing human treatments, were delivered to Houston in February 2012. Over the past fifteen months, these machines have been calibrated, validated and readied for large, non-human subject studies. 

The research is now at its most pivotal state. Our subjects must be in a controlled study, with no variations or flaws. Pigs have been receiving routine injections of cancer into their liver. In July, MRI’s were performed to determine if they have cancer and if they are suitable for treatment using the Kanzius methodology. We await the biopsies now and if affirmative, the Kanzius Noninvasive Radiowave Cancer Treatment will be administered and data will be collected and analyzed. Validating this research is essential in order to reach the FDA and ultimately advance to human trials.

We understand the urgency in developing this treatment, yet our role in the process is complex. We do not set the course or control the process; we fund the research and advocate loudly for you, the cancer community. Your donations make this research possible and the promise of the research fuels your generosity.

A new, interactive timeline showing the tremendous progress made since John’s diagnosis in 2002 is now available online at www.Kanzius.org/timeline. With the top of the mountain in sight, we are steadfast to reach the peak – together!



MARK A. NEIDIG SR. is executive director of the Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation (MNeidig@Kanzius.org). 

 

This blog space has been created to invite and encourage discussion regarding the mission of the Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation and the research of the Kanzius Noninvasive Radiowave Cancer Treatment. Comments that do not stay in line with the message, such as posts attempting to use this forum for promotion or advertising space, gain publicity or that publicly shame an individual or entity, will be deleted.  

The Power of Community in Fighting Cancer

 

Community Against Cancer- Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation

Four years ago, I started as the first executive director for Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation. I knew that I would be helping raise money and awareness for a truly amazing treatment concept and message.  What I didn’t realize was that the majority of the people that believed in our end goal, human trials, didn’t understand the role that we would play in getting there. The Kanzius Foundation does not do research; nor do we own the intellectual properties.  We solely fund research and communicate the research progress taking place in the labs because we believe everyone deserves “a better way.”

Kruise for Kanzius- Fundraiser for Cancer ResearchThe path to increasing awareness and donations is not always the easiest. The “outside” people connected to the project really drive the research forward. While cancer is a disease that causes so much damage to so many, it can also unite those of us who aspire to see changes in the way it is treated. Over the years, I’ve met countless individuals who have come together and are simply looking for a way to help. The Kanzius Foundation strives to create new and fun ways for people to help that don’t just involve entering credit card information and clicking submit, but rather physical ways to get involved. We believe in fostering a community that exists to support one another and share fundraising ideas. Most importantly, we want to create lasting relationships.

Community for Kanzius by Lilly Broadcasting

We have built a strong community of support to help us create fundraising events and raise awareness. Our online community has been incredibly influential in helping the Kanzius Foundation win numerous national awards – I can’t thank supporters enough for the Pepsi Refresh and Pinkwell Challenge wins. While these are prominent events, they are not the only way to get involved if you’d like to help “spread the wave.”

Every week, our global community of supporters and donors hold local fundraising events – some hold golf tournaments, swim challenges or haircut-a-thons – all to help spread the wave. While winning large fundraising challenges is fantastic, it is these local events that drive the success of the Kanzius Foundation. These events are the soul of what the foundation does – they help create a community that drives research to better the world. On our website, you will find ideas for holding your own event and instructions for how to do so.

The recent launch of the “Million Dollar Challenge” has tripled the hard work of each of these grassroots events. In the first six weeks more than $370,000 was raised and then matched with an additional $740,000!  During a recent check presentation, one event planner proudly stated “our hard work multiplied threefold – tell me, where else can you get a return like that?!” 

And it doesn’t stop there. Erie Gives will once again take place on August 13th and the 6th Annual Lilly Broadcasting “Community for Kanzius” Telethon is Monday, October 14th which to date, has raised more than $750,000 to make our research possible.

School Fundraising and Awareness- Fighting CancerOne of the best parts of the Kanzius community is that it is not just adults that are involved - kids can make a difference too. Many of the local events held in different states are set up by children with the help of their parents. For instance, our “Coins for Kanzius” program is a simple and fun initiative where each child is given their own quarter-saver donation book and asked to collect quarters over a designated time period. The goal is to have each person raise quarter donations while spreading awareness of the Kanzius Noninvasive Radiowave Cancer Treatment. This coin initiative is designed for anyone including individuals, groups, and schools.

Over the past few years, I have had the great opportunity to meet with many elected officials in our government including Speaker of the House, John Boehner and House Minority Leader, Nancy Pelosi.  These meetings were made possible thanks to the requests made by Senator Bob Casey and Representative Mike Kelly, and the influential base of Kanzius supporters. You have the unique opportunity to tell your elected representatives and political activists about the Kanzius Noninvasive Radiowave Cancer Treatment and how it could change the way cancer is treated  – all you have to do is pick up the phone or go online and contact your representatives and ask them to join the effort.

It takes more than being passionate about the possibility that this treatment might one day serve as "a better way" to treat cancer. It demands an ongoing commitment of a powerful community to raise awareness and funds which can make research of the Kanzius Noninvasive Radiowave Cancer Treatment a reality. So, until every penny is raised and the treatment has been proven…we’ll keep asking!

 The Power of Community in Fight Cancer

MARK A. NEIDIG SR. is executive director of the Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation (MNeidig@Kanzius.org).

 

This blog space has been created to invite and encourage discussion regarding the mission of the Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation and the research of the Kanzius Noninvasive Radiowave Cancer Treatment. Comments that do not stay in line with the message, such as posts attempting to use this forum for promotion or advertising space, gain publicity or that publicly shame an individual or entity, will be deleted.  

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